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3/31/2015 8:41:00 AMBroccoli keeping worm an bug off 

AprilDawn23
Ranger, WV
25, joined Feb. 2015


How do you keep worms off broccoli without pesticides? I tried one year growing it, the broccoli got big an pretty and when it was ready to pick the worm already destroyed them? Any advice on this little problem?




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3/31/2015 9:32:23 AMBroccoli keeping worm an bug off 

gothygoogoo
Over 10,000 Posts!!! (12,640)
Red Bluff, CA
60, joined Feb. 2015


get some of that grow cloth and cover them before the moths start flying around and laying eggs...if you can't use that, then keep a close eye on the plants and just pinch the caterpillars to kill them or grab them and throw them to the chickens!

good luck...

4/1/2015 2:27:35 PMBroccoli keeping worm an bug off 

tbirdracer
Gainesville, GA
54, joined Nov. 2007


If you spend a lot of time in your garden and often see the little yellow(and other) moths flying around your broccoli, carry an old badminton or tennis racket and whack them when flying. You may find a mild soap solution sprayed on will help, but research that yourself first, and try it on one plant. Also, I have noticed here in n.Ga that the bugs invade the plants as the weather warms, so my earlier plantings make it to harvest before the moths get too active. Also, fall plantings don't seem to get caterpillars at all.
I have also heard chickens and ducks and guineas do a good job of keeping the pests down, but I don't have any.
One last thing, you might just need to pick the broccoli earlier before the head gets as big. You'll have to try a bit of trial and error to see what works organically in your exact garden.

4/1/2015 10:04:41 PMBroccoli keeping worm an bug off 

AprilDawn23
Ranger, WV
25, joined Feb. 2015


Thanks for the advice and tips, I will try them and look up info to

5/4/2015 1:31:27 PMBroccoli keeping worm an bug off 

bluecougareyes
Over 10,000 Posts!!! (27,737)
Chelan, WA
73, joined Nov. 2008


TRY...

Diotomatios Earth < spelling ?) are very old, small sea creatures skeletal remains from millions of years ago.

They have very small sharp points / texture on them and if you dust ( best to use a hand pump duster ) Dust the plants tops and under sides with Diotomastious Earth, the sharp points will cut the outer skin of the worms and they will dehydrate and that kills them.

Diotomatios Earth is not harmful to humans.

If you have 'aphids' use wood stove ashes or garden lime powder, dust tops and mostly bottoms underside of plants, where aphids like to be so they can hid. If you have ants, the ants will carry aphids to other plants to infest as meany garden plants as possible if they can. Get rid of the ants, buy some "Tarro' brand ant killer at you local 'ACE' hardware store. ( It's not harmful to Humans, pets or wild animals )

5/5/2015 8:57:12 AMBroccoli keeping worm an bug off 

artist820
Over 4,000 Posts! (4,544)
Tehachapi, CA
61, joined Jan. 2013


Quote from bluecougareyes:
TRY...

Diotomatios Earth < spelling ?) are very old, small sea creatures skeletal remains from millions of years ago.

They have very small sharp points / texture on them and if you dust ( best to use a hand pump duster ) Dust the plants tops and under sides with Diotomastious Earth, the sharp points will cut the outer skin of the worms and they will dehydrate and that kills them.

Diotomatios Earth is not harmful to humans.

If you have 'aphids' use wood stove ashes or garden lime powder, dust tops and mostly bottoms underside of plants, where aphids like to be so they can hid. If you have ants, the ants will carry aphids to other plants to infest as meany garden plants as possible if they can. Get rid of the ants, buy some "Tarro' brand ant killer at you local 'ACE' hardware store. ( It's not harmful to Humans, pets or wild animals )
my 77 year-old occupational therapist (God Rest her soul) swears by diatomaceous soil. She would dust it all over her collards. Isn't broccoli from the same family?

5/7/2015 12:50:14 PMBroccoli keeping worm an bug off 

bluecougareyes
Over 10,000 Posts!!! (27,737)
Chelan, WA
73, joined Nov. 2008


Quote from artist820:
my 77 year-old occupational therapist (God Rest her soul) swears by diatomaceous soil. She would dust it all over her collards. Isn't broccoli from the same family?

Not sure about collard greens.

But Broccoli is in the plant family, known colloquially as "cole crops" within the genus Brassica.

Brassica ( or "cole crops" ) Plant Family" - are listed below.

* Nursing

" Brassica species may cause "baby colic" in breast-feeding.


OR do your own web search.... using the search engine @: www.startpage.com


MORE INFO. from: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cruciferous_vegetables

Cruciferous vegetables are vegetables of the family Brassicaceae (also called Cruciferae). These vegetables are widely cultivated, with many genera, species, and cultivars being raised for food production

such as cauliflower, cabbage, garden cress, bok choy, broccoli, brussels sprouts and similar green leaf vegetables. The family takes its alternate name (Cruciferae, New Latin for "cross-bearing") from the shape of their flowers, whose four petals resemble a cross.

Ten of the most common cruciferous vegetables eaten by people, known colloquially as cole crops,[1] are in a single species (B. oleracea); they are not distinguished from one another taxonomically, only by horticultural category of cultivar groups. Numerous other genera and species in the family are also edible.

Cruciferous vegetables are one of the dominant food crops worldwide. They are high in vitamin C and soluble fiber and contain multiple nutrients and phytochemicals.


** The taxonomy of common cruciferous vegetables common name
genus, ARE...


Horseradish
Land cress
Ethiopian mustard
Kale
collard greens
Chinese broccoli
Cabbage
Savoy cabbage
Brussels sprouts
Kohlrabi
Broccoli
Broccoflower
Broccoli romanesco
Cauliflower
wild broccoli
bok choy
Komatsuna
Mizuna Brassica
Rapini (broccoli rabe)
Flowering cabbage
Chinese cabbage, aka, napa cabbage
Turnip root; greens
Rutabaga (swede)
Siberian kale
Canola/rapeseed
Wrapped heart mustard cabbage
Mustard seeds, brown; greens
White mustard seeds
Black mustard seeds
Tatsoi
Wild arugula
Arugula (rocket)
Field pepperweed
Maca
Garden cress
Watercress
Radish
Daikon ( a large 10 to 12 in. white radish, very popular in Japan )
Wasabi ( very hot to the taste: Used and popular in Japan with rice sushi rolls )


,

6/4/2015 7:59:28 AMBroccoli keeping worm an bug off 

janet5360
Pittsburgh, PA
65, joined Dec. 2013


Mixture of liquid baby soap and water sprayed on the underside and stem of plant sometimes helps..

6/5/2015 2:46:03 PMBroccoli keeping worm an bug off 
just_zoe1958
Over 10,000 Posts!!! (20,787)
Burlington, VT
59, joined Dec. 2011


Quote from gothygoogoo:
get some of that grow cloth and cover them before the moths start flying around and laying eggs...if you can't use that, then keep a close eye on the plants and just pinch the caterpillars to kill them or grab them and throw them to the chickens!

good luck...



I never thought of this, Whalemstr. I might try light weight fabric netting on my squashes. I have seen those moths crawl on the ground to get to my buttercup squash but it's worth a try. Thank you.

We have lots of cabbage and sulfur butterflies that go after our cabbage and broccoli as well.